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Wir stellen vor: Der Assault AirRunner

Airrunner

Assault Fitness Products, Macher des weltbekannten Assault AirBike, haben das nächste grosse Ding auf den Elite-Fitness Markt gebracht: Der Assault AirRunner. Dieses erstklassige Laufband packt ein intensives Workout in ein kleines Paket. Der Name sagt alles: Wie laufen in der Luft, aber mit einem kräftigen Kick. Dieses Laufband ist wie kein anderes, welches du kennst. Es ist für den kommerziellen Einsatz entwickelt, verbrennt bis zu 30% mehr Kalorien als die durchschnittlichen strombetriebene Versionen und ist für jedes Fitness Level geeignet.

 

Ein paar AirRunner Highlights:

 

  • Komplett mechanisch - Null Strom Konsum
  • Optimal für Intervall-Training - Designed mit HIIT im Hinterkopf, verbrennt dieser Badboy bis zu 30% mehr Kalorien als die tradionellen Laufbänder
  • Kommerzielle Langlebigkeit - Gemacht aus einem Stahlrahmen und Handschiene, korrosionsresistente Hardware und ein Latten-Rollband, welches bis zu 150'000 Meilen aushält

 

Shop your new AirRunner today!

WOD NATION REVIEW

Did you see the WOD NATION Review on our Assault AirBike? We love it :-)

6 WAYS TO FALL IN LOVE WITH THE ASSAULT AIR BIKE

 
PHOTOCREDIT: CROSSFIT VERO BEACH
 

I didn’t think it was possible to hate something more than rowing (I’m 5’1”, firmly in the CrossFit Hobbit division), and then my box owner brought in a new torture device: the Assault Air Bike. This seemingly innocuous piece of machinery is worlds away from the comfy stationary bikes found in the local Globo gym or spin classes; it’s a nefarious bike that ramps up the resistance as you push, pull, and pedal your way through a WOD or cash out. But as hated as it can be, it also is a great piece of equipment to add in to WODs – and to use on your own pre- or post-WOD.

1. IT CHALLENGES DIFFERENT MUSCLE GROUPS.

The whole point of CrossFit is to constantly vary workouts. It’s part of the philosophy, and it’s why you can go months at your box and never see the same WOD twice. In the CrossFit in 100 Words summary, the first thing you should do hard and fast is bike, followed by running, swimming, and rowing. Adding the Assault bike into WODs adds another movement that challenges your quads and your arms in different ways.

2. IT TORCHES CALORIES.

You could say the same for the rower – but plenty of people join CrossFit boxes to lose weight. The Assault bike burns calories like crazy because you’re using both your upper and lower body to work, and you’re getting some serious conditioning to boot. It can help you break through training plateaus.

3. IT TOUGHENS YOU MENTALLY.

CrossFit in itself fosters mental toughness, but when you add in some Assault bike tabata, you learn just how long 20 seconds can be. But it also helps you learn to control your mind during tough workouts and push through them.

4. IT HELPS YOU RECOVER FROM INJURIES.

If you can’t run or row due to an injury, like a rolled ankle, you can sub in the Assault bike. It’s movement without the impact, and because you’re moving, you’re getting blood flowing into the area to speed recovery. (Of course, clear it with your doctor before you go back to the box, and ask your coach.)

5. IT HELPS WITH ACTIVE RECOVERY.

On off days, if you normally sit around and do nothing, you’re probably not getting the most out of those days. Rest days are good for going for walks, doing some mobility work, or hopping on the Assault bike for a 10-minute moderate intensity ride.

6. IT’S… A FAN.

If nothing else, the Assault bike is a fan. If you’re sweating away next to a few of them, you’ll at least get a breeze going (which is really nice during Texas summers). During a partner WOD, while your partner pedals away, you can enjoy the breeze while you rest – just don’t forget to return the favor when it’s your turn to hop on the bike.

The next time you get to the box early, hop on one of those Satan’s tricycles for a moderate ride to get the blood flowing. Or, after a WOD, use it to unload (again, at a moderate pace). It will help you get used to the whole-body activity – and may even help you fall in love with the Assault bike.

This is a guest post from Christine Parizo, a half marathoner and new CrossFitter based in Houston. She recently qualified for guaranteed entry for the Houston Marathon and plans to run it in 2017. Christine blogs about running, CrossFit, and fitness at RunOutoftheBox.com. You can follow Christine on InstagramTwitter, and Facebook.

The Music Behind “Fittest on Earth: The Story of the 2015 Reebok CrossFit Games”

By Heber Cannon

Music behind 

In this video, composer  Chad Cannon  offers a look into the creative process behind the music featured in “Fittest on Earth: The Story of the 2015 Reebok CrossFit Games,” co-directed by his brother, Heber.

“Since this is a film for CrossFit and there’s a lot of energy in CrossFit, … I couldn’t quite convey that without creating some type of new sound world that can engage with that type of energy level,” Chad explains.

Cannon recalls hearing that the film would include music by  Junkie XL , a music producer who worked on the soundtrack for “Mad Max: Fury Road” and remixed the Elvis Presley track “A Little Less Conversation” in 2002. Following Junkie XL’s lead, Cannon decided to build his own percussion library by creating and recording unique sounds.

“My landlord collects all sorts of metal, so I said, ‘Hey, John, we could make a lot of noise with your junk in your junkyard,’” Cannon says.

Using wagon wheels, oil barrels, old gasoline tanks and other scraps, the two set to work building their own musical instruments. Cannon then combined the new with the traditional to “make this original percussion sound” that would “capture the energy” of the CrossFit community.

 "Fittest on Earth: The Story of the 2015 Reebok CrossFit Games”  premieres on iTunes Tuesday, Feb. 23.

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Video by Heber Cannon.

3min 31sec

Additional reading:  “CrossFit Inspires Singer’s ‘Fight’”  by Kate Moran, published Jan. 20, 2012.

READ MORE 

SHAPE Magazine AirBike Workout

Nice article by shape magazin on efficient workouts on our Assault AirBike!

The Assault Air Bike Workout That Burns a Crap-ton of Calories

A 26-minute express workout that will help transform your body fast.

Carly Graf's picture  

Unlike its road or indoor cycling counterparts, the air bike uses a fan (which is why it's also called a fan bike) to generate wind resistance, so the harder you pedal, the harder pedaling gets. Meanwhile, your chest, back, arms, abs, and obliques get sculpted double time as you aggressively push and pull the handles to generate more power and speed.

"You waste no time ramping up or gearing down," says Ian Armond, a program manager at Basecamp Fitness in Santa Monica, California, which is known for its HIIT workouts featuring the Assault AirBike. "There's no effort level you can hit that the bike can't match, so the calorie-burn potential is nearly unlimited."

 

Sure, you could use this bike for endurance workouts, but it truly shines in short bursts of all-out pushes, Armond says, which is why he created this workout alternating 40-second intervals of air biking with body-weight strengtheners. Strap your feet into the pedals and ride like hell, gripping the handles firmly as you push them out and pull them in with as much force as you can muster—the harder you go, the more resistance you create and the bigger burn you earn.

"You'll engage your entire body and push up to your cardio max for faster results," Armond says. (Psst...We have more workout equipment that gets you fitter faster.)

You'll likely feel on the brink of exhaustion throughout because you won't get much of a breather. But that's the point. "The bike won't let you plateau because you can never fully acclimate to the resistance," he says. "It's the sweet spot for melting fat and building muscle because you're constantly being pushed just outside your comfort zone." Try his power ride: We think you'll be a fan of what it does for your body.

 
Assault Airbike Front

Your Workout

TOTAL TIME: 26 minutes

YOU'LL NEED: An air bike. Most gyms have them; ask a trainer to point one out if you need help.

HOW IT WORKS: Start with the warm-up. Then complete 12 rounds of alternating 40 seconds on the bike (shoot for an effort level of 250 watts or better) with 40 seconds of body-weight strength exercises, taking 20 seconds to transition between each round.

WARM-UP: Do 1 minute each of high-knees running, then inchworms (from standing, fold forward and walk hands out to plank position, walk feet toward hands, then stand; repeat).

Round 1

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do jumping jacks for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 2

 
 

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do straight-leg bicycle kicks for 40 seconds: Lie faceup on floor with hands behind head and arms bent wide, legs long and hovering above floor. Lift left leg and rotate torso to touch right elbow to left knee; switch sides and repeat. Continue alternating sides. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 3

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do power mountain climbers for 40 seconds: Start on floor in plank on palms. Step left foot up to outside of left hand. Hop to switch sides. Continue alternating sides. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 4

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do squat 180 jumps for 40 seconds: Stand with feet hip-width apart and arms by sides. Squat, then jump as high as you can, rotating midair so you land facing opposite direction. Continue alternating sides. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 5

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do squat lateral leg lifts for 40 seconds: Stand with feet hip-width apart and arms by sides. Squat, then stand, raising left leg out to side up to hip height. Continue alternating sides. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 6

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do V-ups for 40 seconds: Lie faceup on floor with arms extended overhead and legs long. Lift torso and legs, coming onto tailbone so body forms a V. Lower. Repeat. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 7

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do speed skaters for 40 seconds: From standing, hop to left side, landing on left leg, bringing right leg back and across left, as you reach right hand to touch left foot. Continue alternating sides. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 8

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do blastoff push-ups for 40 seconds: Start in crouched position on floor with arms extended in front of you. Spring body forward into plank position, then do 1 push-up, pushing back to start. Repeat. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 9

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do lunge kickers for 40 seconds: Stand with feet hip-width apart and arms by sides. Step right leg back into a reverse lunge, bending right arm forward and left arm back. Stand on left leg, kicking right leg forward and driving arms in opposite directions. Repeat for 20 seconds. Switch sides; repeat. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 10

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do side-plank knee drives for 40 seconds: Start on floor in side plank on left palm. Bring right elbow and knee together to touch near waistline. Repeat for 20 seconds. Switch sides; repeat. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 11

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do plank walks for 40 seconds: Start on floor in plank on palms. Lower to forearm plank one arm at a time. Return to plank on palms one arm at a time. Continue alternating sides. Take 20 seconds to get onto the bike.

Round 12

Pedal as fast as you can for 40 seconds. Take 20 seconds to get off the bike.
Do sizzle sprawls for 40 seconds: Run in place with fast feet. Every 5 to 10 seconds, drop, lowering entire body to the floor. Pop up and immediately resume fast feet. Repeat.

San Francisco to ABA: Sugar-Disease Link Is Clear

By Andréa Maria Cecil

San Francisco 

City attorneys offer strong opposition to American Beverage Association motion for a preliminary injunction seeking to strike down an ordinance requiring warnings on sugary-drink ads.

The debate over whether sugar-sweetened beverages cause a host of metabolic derangements is akin to the one on global warming, said Harold Goldstein, executive director of the  California Center for Public Health Advocacy .

“You might be able to find somebody that says global warning isn’t man made … but they probably are the only person,” he joked.

When it comes to linking sugary drinks to health concerns, scientists are no longer choosing the word “contribute,” Goldstein noted, but “cause.”

“The best scientists in the country are now clear that sugary beverages cause diabetes, obesity, tooth decay, heart disease. It’s now  met the scientific criteria  to show that it’s a direct cause.”

Attorneys for the City and County of San Francisco  know as much .

On Feb. 23, they filed a legal opposition in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California to the American Beverage Association (ABA) motion for a preliminary injunction on a  San Francisco ordinance .

. The municipal measure requires health-warning labels on ads for sugary drinks. The  ABA —the trade group that represents the country’s nonalcoholic beverage industry—on July 24  filed suit  against San Francisco. Joining the suit are the California Retailers Association and the California State Outdoor Advertising Association. They claim the ordinance violates the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment, which guarantees multiple freedoms, including speech.

In its opposition, the city flatly refuted the association’s claim that the ordinance defies the First Amendment.

READ MORE 

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